In a study conducted by researchers at WalletHub, Ohio ranked 24 out of 50 states (plus the District of Columbia) for its healthcare. With this score, Ohio falls in the middle of the best and worst states for healthcare. 

In order to make these determinations, the public health professionals assessed and weighed three factors: access, cost and outcomes. 

‘Access’ rank

In the ‘access’ category, researchers looked at factors such as physicians per capita, quality of the public hospital systems, Medicaid acceptance rate, average emergency room wait time and urgent-care centers per capita. Ohio ranked 29th in this area. 

‘Cost’ rank

To calculate the cost of healthcare in states, the study included costs of medical and dental visits, average monthly insurance premium, average hospital expenses per inpatient day at community hospitals and more. 

This was Ohio’s best category, coming in at eighth for reasonable cost. 

‘Outcomes’ rank

Compared to the rest of the states, Ohio was only 34th for health outcomes. The study included different outcomes such as infant, child and maternal mortality rates, life expectancy, heart disease and stroke rate, adults with no dental visits in the past year, non-immunized children, readmission to hospitals and cancer incidence rate. 

Ohio is the fourth best state for the lowest percentage of at-risk adults who did not have a routine doctor visit in the last two years. 

All in all, even though costs for healthcare in Ohio surpassed many other states for affordability, the state falls behind when it comes to access to medical treatment and overall outcomes.